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Welsh Smash satwcomic.com

Welsh Smash


I recently spent a week in Wales and it was an absolute joy. There's so much to see and the people are great, so I will most likely go back next year.

And one thing you can't help but be impressed by is the Welsh written language. Never before have I seen a language look so random, and I learned that it's a running joke that Welsh is basically just random key smashing. And I don't mean that mockingly, because that is bloody amazing.


19th November 2013

Tagged in Wales

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282 Comments:
 
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5 months ago #9446951        
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Once you know how to pronounce the letters in our alphabet, it's rather simple to read and pronounce.

It gets a little complicated around the letter f (pronounced like a 'v', 'ff' is 'f') and 'dd', 'll' are variations of the 'th' sound (not quite, but close enough).

And we also have 'ch' (which sounds kind of like you're trying to spit - "like the ch in the Scottish word ‘loch’, but with more phlegm"), 'ng' ("as in ‘song’, where the g isn’t hard, like in ‘gig’, but a soft glottal stop made in your throat" - sometimes you see Nghymru (original: Cymru), which is a mutation of the word for the sake of grammar), 'ph' ('English' f, like 'ff'), 'r' must be rolled (if you can roll your r's), 'rh' ("make a huffy, breathy sound before your rolled ‘r’").

And we pronounce the other letters in the alphabet differently too.

... You don't really realise how... strange it is until you write it down...

(I had to look up how to pronounce some letters, as some are hard to describe when you're used to them and have known them since you were little)

Eventually, Welsh letters make sense. It's hilarious to see young children learn both alphabets in school and try to keep them separate! (We're very bilingual here; lots of people speak both Welsh and English)



2 years ago #9283747        
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Actually Welsh makes much more sense than English xD English is soooo much more complicated and random. As soon as you know the Welsh alphabet, you can read everything. But if you know the English alphabet...you'll read like half of the words wrong. Maybe even more ;)



2 months ago #9482268        
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I just used Google Translate to see a few Welsh words. It really does look like you smash your head against the keyboard.



Lumoseo

13 F
8 months ago #9423641        
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After reading this I went on google new tab and typed in translate English to Welsh...

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9 months ago #9413232        
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I love languages like Welch. Also Gaelic is incredible. I went to Ireland for a while and it's just wonderful hearing whole groups of schoolchildren speaking Gaelic. But also a bit weird that they have to make up words these day, because they don't have everything, especially in modern word usage...
In Afrikaans they do a similar thing...



9 months ago #9411659        
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HA HA HA!!! XD



9 months ago #9411271        
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I remember this guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHxO0UdpoxM O__O



11 months ago #9395084        
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@KofodDane well welsh is the oldest language still in use (it dates back to around the bronze age at least) though much of what is used today (i.e. modern welsh) was actually developed by an english man (who's name slips my mind right now) because he found middle welsh hard to understand (you don't want to see middle or old welsh lol)

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Hazzamo

17 M
1 year ago #9332989        
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Ahh wales, a country with so few resources they have to import vowels.

And you need half a pint of phlem in you throat to pronounce 'fluffy'



8 months ago #9421900        
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O kaip jums lietuvi┼│ kalba atrodo? Ar taip pat ne normaliai?



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