Scandinavia and the World
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Comments #9472507:


Dress the Part 9 4, 8:08pm

@Bloodblender @TheSwedishMoose (mongols ?) jokes or not but....
Finnish dna is only 7% different than for example Danish dna;

Your Regional Ancestry: Reference PopulationsFinnish;
"Modern day indigenous populations around the world carry particular blends of nine regional affiliations. We compared your DNA results to the averages from each of 43 reference populations we currently have in our database and estimated which of these populations were most similar to you in terms of the genetic markers you carry."

Finnish;
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/populations_Finnish_575.png
This reference population is based on samples collected from people native to Finland. The dominant 57% northern European component likely reflects the earliest settlers in Europe, hunter-gatherers who arrived there more than 35,000 years ago. The 17% Mediterranean and 17% Southwest Asian percentages arrived later, with the spread of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East, over the past 10,000 years. As these early farmers moved into Europe, they spread their genetic patterns as well. Today, northern European populations retain the links to both earliest Europeans and these later migrants from the Middle East. The 7% Northeast Asian component reflects mixing with native Siberian populations, particularly the reindeer-herding Saami people of far northern Scandinavia.

Danish;
https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/populations_Danish_575.png
This reference population is based on samples collected from people living in Denmark. The dominant 53% Northern European component likely reflects the earliest settlers in Europe, hunter-gatherers who arrived there more than 35,000 years ago. The 30% Mediterranean and 16% Southwest Asian percentages arrived later, with the spread of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent in the Middle East over the past 10,000 years. As these early farmers moved into Europe, they spread their genetic patterns as well. Today, northern European populations retain the links to both earliest Europeans and these later migrants from the Middle East.

https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/reference-populations/

"For over 600 years Swedish was Finland’s official language. This historical fact has, of course, left its mark. Even though Finnish is totally different from Swedish, there are a lot of loan words from the Swedish language – over 4000."
"Finally I would also like to mention, that Mikael Agricola (the father of the Finnish language), who actually invented written Finnish from scratch and translated the first books (including the New Testament) into Finnish spoke Swedish as his mother tongue."
"As you see, there is a tight connection between the Swedish and Finnish languages and if there would not have been, that would be just odd."
"For a complete list of words that are identical in Finnish and Swedish (many of which are actually proper nouns), please see the attachment:
http://www.lexiophiles.com/english/finnish-and-swedish-in-cooperation

Language and culture/people are two different thing in Finland. Finnish language is uralic language that is truth.
"Indo-European languages come from India (or rather, what is known as the nation of India today). Do you mean that English-speakers should look to India and Pakistan cause they have alot in common with these cultures as the language originates from there???? Well if the Uralic language has Russian roots you are suggesting that Finland has more in common with Russia and its culture rather than Sweden since Swedish is a Germanic language ?????? It just like stating that Malta has more in common with the Arabic world and its culture than it does with Italy as the Maltese language is a Semitic language."

"There are various myths and beliefs concerning the origins of the Finnish people. Some of them have been based on political purposes. Nationalist science was convinced that the home of the Finns was located in the east around the river Volga and the Ural mountains. The modern research, however, gives both the eastern and western identity to the Finnish people. Nowadays the archeology, genetics and Finno-Ugrism are separating the language and the genes."
"The latest research on mitochondrial genotype seems to strengthen the view that the Finns are genetically mostly Indoeuropean population. Genetics in general present the view that the original Finnish people have been the dominant population in Finland through the centuries although there has been a significant mixture from migration in various times. Therefore the Finns are related to the Balts, Germanic people and Balticfinns. Thus the genes of the Finnish people are mainly of western origin as well as those of the other nations which were proceeding northwards at the end of the recent glacial period. The language has come from the east and belongs to the Uralic family although it contains many loanwords from Indoeuropean languages such as Baltic, Germanic and Russian."

"In the present day Finland there are also the Samis, who are linguistically related to Finns but differ genetically from them thoroughly. The Sami language separated from Proto Finnish some 4000 years ago. The genes of the Samis are totally different from any other Scandinavian nation."
http://hyl.edu.hel.fi/sivut/comenius/fi/finfact.html

It is good to remember that none of the nations are pure, all the nations are some kind of mixtures, for example something about 20% of Swedish are immigrants.
Have you seen this report in Washington post;
"Finnish was the second language of Sweden for centuries. Now Arabic is overtaking it."
"Sweden isn't the only European country to have Arabic as a second most spoken language. Parkvall's research found it was the same in Denmark and that Arabic was the third most spoken language in France and the Netherlands."
"Sweden isn't the only European country to have Arabic as a second most spoken language. Parkvall's research found it was the same in Denmark and that Arabic was the third most spoken language in France and the Netherlands."
"However, this may be a historic shift for Sweden. "For as long as Sweden has existed, Finnish has been the second language," Parkvall said, adding that this dominance of the Finnish language in Sweden goes back at least 1,000 years. Now, Finnish is dwindling, with the majority of modern speakers -- Finnish immigrants who moved to Sweden in the 1960s and 70s -- dying out and their children speaking the language rarely, if at all.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/04/07/finnish-was-the-second-language-of-sweden-for-centuries-now-arabic-is-overtaking-it/





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