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Size matters





 

Size matters



I wasn't planning on posting a comic about this yet, but people have spammed me with the "ÆØÅ (Size Matters)" song so much that I thought I might as well post it now to let people know that yes, I have seen it.

(Before you click the link, know that the song isn't about who has the biggest alphabet in the world, but simply about the Norwegians desperately looking for something they have that's bigger than what USA has) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f488uJAQgmw

28th September 2012
 


513 Comments:
 
23 days ago #9189819        

those letters sound like the French pronounciation of a, e and o.....



icho

21 F
27 days ago #9186884        

@Beldarius Probably my ancestors actually came from Siberia so they kept the Siberian grammar, but thanks to hanging out with Chinese folks for 2000 years, they substituted 70% of vocabs with Chinese ones. So now it's likely that spoken Finnish and Korean/Japanese would not sound exactly alike, but we might share vowels, consonants, and grammar.



28 days ago #9186159        

@icho
...Korean is related to Siberian? Then that explains why our languages are so similar. See, Finnish is part of the Finno-Ugric language family and it's thought to have originated somewhere to the west of the Ural mountains. Which means that we DO have Siberian "cousin" languages.



3 months ago #9147679        

@icho
Well, genetics and culture can behave in supricing ways, spreading in different directions. For example, swedish sami are geneticly closer to germanic swedes than they are to norwegian, finnish and russian sami, but the culture is mostly the same as other sami.

Facinating about how the language have behaved. I cant help but wonder what kind of historical events could have caused such an development. It must have been somthing big.



icho

21 F
3 months ago #9147543        

@Bloodblender I would've never guessed that relationship by myself, because I somehow had an impression that finns, sami, ainu, and siberians all look so different. In fact, siberians probably look more similar to north koreans than to finns. But then it was just not a good idea to connect people's looks to their languages; ex) south koreans look so chinese yet korean language is so different from chinese.

What's interesting about japanese language is that it lost everything else from ancient siberian roots, but kept the grammar well. Thanks to that, other siberian-related languages have direct and complete translation to japanese to some extent. In our case, the grammar is so similar that even google translate doesn't grammar-fail.



3 months ago #9147077        

It would work best in Esperanto which has 28 letters!



3 months ago #9147035        

@icho
The finnougric speaking peoples, wich includes the finns and the sami, have a close relation with Siberia. In fact, a large area from northern Norway (sami) in the west, to northern Japan (ainu) in the east, have a close relation. If you go back in time a bit further, this also includes northern Canada (inuits). It makes sense that there is a similarity.



icho

21 F
3 months ago #9144028        

@Beldarius
Oh, so Japanese pronunciation and grammar is similar to Finnish? Then I should definitely try learning Finnish at some point. Korean and Japanese have exactly same grammar and somewhat similar pronunciation. So if Finnish and Japanese have something in common, Finnish and Korean should also have something in common. It would be fun if the languages are actually related! Ours relates deeply to ancient Siberian. What about yours?

Well after all, Finland and the Korean peninsula are 'very close' :D They are only one country between Fin and NK..............Russia..........



El_Zato

36 M
3 months ago #9137875        

I'll leave this here, in Spanish:
"Mi papá tiene 57 años" = My dad is 57 years old.
"Mi papa tiene 57 anos" = My potato has 57 buttholes.



Callid

21 M
3 months ago #9135135        

@DECtape The English alphabet is way more inefficient than the Scandinavian one. What, for example, is that E in "are" doing? What is the purpose of the GH in "though"? And how come "word" is pronounced like "nerd", not like "lord"? So yes, English is the only major Germanic language that only uses 26 letters - and the also the only Germanic language with a completely chaotic spelling system (and the few rules it does have are nothing like the rules all other languages with 26 letters follow - unlike, for the most part, the other Germanic languages: German "I" = Swedish "I" = Latin "I" = Italian "I" = Spanish "I" = freaking Japanese "I" = English "E").



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