Scandinavia and the World
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It's tradition satwcomic.com

It's tradition


It's important to keep traditions alive...

9th February 2018

Tagged in Denmark Sweden Norway England


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8 days ago #9731774        
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This ... makes me remember one of my saddest memories. I'm Danish, and I used to do the whole whopping my parents out of bed with my fastelavnsris when I was little. Until one day in kindergarten, where we had made our own fastelavnsris, I saw one of them thrown on the ground outside when it was time to go home. It belonged to the sweetest little girl from my group, who had really awful parents, and it turned out that they had thrown it away because she had been enthusiastic about it. She came back and told us, innocent like kids are, that she wasn't allowed to have one because her parents would beat her if she used it on them.

That was the straw, and child services was involved. I was only very little, but I remember feeling sad every time I saw a fastelavnsris after that.

It's never been festive to me since.

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9 days ago #9731369        
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Oh, the memories.
When I was a kid, we used to do this, only with baseball bats, and go: "Say, this is a nice house you've got there. It'd be a shame if something happened to it..."

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8 days ago #9732100        
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Thought the next comic would be about the Norwegian Olympic team ordering 15,000 eggs. Ahh well. this is still cute.

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8 days ago #9731693        
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When I first moved to Scandinvia I asked what the colorful branches were and got told that it's called 'fastelavnsris'. I misunderstood and thought they said they're celebrating 'faste lave pris' (everyday low prices). Given the price levels in Scandinavia for everything I figured it was a sarcastic celebration.

4 days ago #9733456        
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Seems that if England stays around, he may find himself in a STICKy situation. (my brain can't stop making puns ;-;)

3 days ago #9734046        
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Classic, Norway is the fox

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juriette

24 F
5 days ago #9733387        
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can I mention Humon already made a comic about this?
http://nielsg.com/happy-fastelavn

it's a special holiday for furry S/M fans!

5 days ago #9733370        
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Is this the time to mention that we also used to put a black cat in a barrel and beat it with bats until the barrel broke and that when the cat fell out, children would continue beating it 'till it died? Nowadays we just put candy instead of traumatised cats in the barrel. The tradition is still called beating the cat off the barrel, though.

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Velgar

28 M
5 days ago #9733046        
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In Finland it has been a bit of tradition (dying one, I hear, but nonetheless) for kids to take willow branches (a lot of them), with preferably lots of catkin, during Easter, decorate the branches with colourful papers, tassels, yarns, whatevers.

They then gear up as a "trulli", basically a witch of sorts, but any old costume goes and go from house to house "virpomassa", yes whipping, but mostly just tapping people with the decorated branches.

It's pretty much our Halloween, since not many used to go candyhunting during the Ween, but on Easter instead.

And the whipping part was meant to drive bad things out of you. "Virvon, varvon, tuoreeks, terveeks tulevaks vuodeks. Vitsa sulle, palkka mulle." which roughly translates to something like "I flick and whips for health so grisp for coming year. Branch for you, pay for me." and yes, it does sound silly and clumsy even in Finnish. There are so other sayings as well, but that's the one I know.

You then gave the branch to the one receiving the "blessing" of sorts and in return they give you chocolate eggs, candy in general or just a sweet hug if you weren't prepared. Some times even money exchanged hands when dealing with relatives. Granted, the parents going out with the kids usually took that, but it was somewhat spent on candy, so it was all good.

The old tradition even made you wait for a week before you could go ask for your payment. Guess back in the day people wanted to see that the "treatment" worked before paying. :D

7 days ago #9732452        
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I am disappointed that I have not heard of this before! What's the point of me having Scandinavian friends who don't tell me these things!

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