Scandinavia and the World
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What did you say? satwcomic.com

What did you say?


Ah, the languages of the Nordics.

Few people realize this, but Norwegians actually speak a language that is far closer to old Danish than Norwegian, while people on Iceland actually speak something close to old Norwegian.
Little FennoSwede is holding on to his uncle Finland because FennoSwedes are Finns who speak Swedish.

Though, you could really just say Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and to some extend Icelandic (But not Finnish) are nothing more than different dialects, seeing as we understand each other if we talk reeeeaaaaly slow and clear.

And it will of course never not be funny how some Americans treat British like a completely different language. :XD:
Sure, some words are different and it’s a different accent, but try coming to Europe. We’ll show you what “different language” means. ;)


25th July 2010

Tagged in Iceland Denmark America Norway FennoSwede England Finland Sweden

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806 Comments:
 
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Spexon

20 M
3 months ago #9418066        
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Swedes and norwegians can normally understand eachother without talking any slower than normally :) just look at Skavlan



7 months ago #9376616        
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Does this make Finland special or just "special" compared to the rest of the gang? :)



3 years ago #8891723        
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Well, in south norwegian we have a danish-influeced language, while in the western/northen parts the language in impressively good preserved.



4 years ago #8264092        
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what about Sami people? :) here in the north. we can understand each other



10 days ago #9449630        
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I dunno..I just really fond with Norwegian language (I can not understand a word) and Norwegian's English - is very soothing to listen



2 months ago #9432603        
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I've watched some Disney songs in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian and some words do resemble. Each language has its charm.
I haven't heard Icelandic versions though.



2 months ago #9432601        
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It reminds me the fact that there are many Americans being wankering idiots when it comes to geography. It gets on my nerves.
Many Americans, not all of them but quite a huge quantity, think Mexico is the only Spanish speaking country, hence all Latinos in USA are Mexican. Such morons.



2 months ago #9428297        
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In old Lancashire and North Yorkshire dialect there are a lot of Norse loan-words (like "fell" for fjell / fjall ) and in the Orkney Islands if the Norwegians speak slowly the Orcadians can understand and even answer them. When I first came to live in rural Lancashire I could not understand the locals at all, -- though they could understand my "BBC" standard English fine. Now I understand them and even use a few of the local constructions (such as dropping "the" before concrete nouns; saying "tha' [thee] instead of "you" when yelling at people who forget to close the gates).



Boz-pot

31 O
4 months ago #9416279        
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'British' isn't a language. Yes, there's British English and American English (and others) but British itself is not a language. It always amuses me when Americans talk about speaking with a 'British' accent - that would be some weird mixture of Scottish, English, Welsh and Northern Irish accents! :D



6 months ago #9394446        
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Languages can be so confusing :)



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